Instagram Morning

I was quite a late converter to Instagram. I didn't want to become the sort of person who shared with the world a photo of what I'd had for dinner that day or how I'd just tried on six pairs of jeans that didn't suit. I'd tried Twitter, Facebook, Tumbler and Flickr but Instagram had remained a mystery to me. Last year, however, I took the plunge and opened my Cambridgebyphoto Instagram account -https://www.instagram.com/cambridgebyphoto  by the way, as a way of sharing more of my Cambridge and local area photos. This weeks image is taken from my Instagram account and is subject to one of the other innovations and popular fads brought about by the photo sharing giant. Filters.....

I use Adobe Lightroom to process all my images and have always loved a good filter. The sheer number of photo enhancing options (not always the case) that Instagram gives you is amazing. Some are, as you would expect better than others. I am a particular fan of the retro effect ones. The ones that make a modern image look as though it was taken by some old analogue camera from decades ago. Used too often they can make an account look over processed and over familiar. I have been guilty in the past of overusing photo filters on some of my images - I do like an abstract looking image and I'm completely aware that they aren't to everyone's taste! This week, however, I think works.

The image was taken on a misty morning by the side of the River Cam, just up from the Mill Pond. To the left is the Garden House hotel (highly recommended for a drink by the river side). I was originally taken shots of the punts that were moored up along the river side. It was only when I got home that I noticed the figures on the right-hand side. It gives the image an extra draw for your eyes. I tried several different filters and colours while processing, monochrome, HDR and even leaving the image untouched just didn't work. It was only when I dropped it into Instagram and started playing about with the retro filters that I happened upon the final choice.

Taken with a Canon70D with a Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS / Iso 250 /  F7.1